9.00

REGISTRATION

9.30

MORNING PLENARY SESSION

Chaired by Jennifer McDermott,
Withers Introduction from the Chair

9.40

THE BILL OF RIGHTS COMMISSION

Vernon Bogdanor, Professor of Government, Oxford University

In March, following parliamentary disquiet about implementing the European Court of Human Rights' judgment in Hirst concerning voting rights for prisoners, the government announced the formation of a commission `to investigate the creation of a UK Bill of Rights'. Is this a good faith attempt to improve human rights protection in the UK or a cynical attempt to undermine it?

10.00

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

Helen Mountfield QC, Matrix Chambers

10.30

DISCUSSION AND QUESTIONS

11.00

MORNING TEA BREAK

11.15

MORNING BREAKOUT SESSIONS

[please choose one session from the following three]


1. CRIMINAL LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS UPDATE

Alex Bailin QC, Matrix Chambers
Kirsty Brimelow QC, Doughty Street Chambers

An overview of key criminal law and human rights cases and legislative developments:

  • Analyse all significant decisions of the Divisional Court, Court of Appeal, House of Lords and European Court of Human Rights
  • Examine the impact of the Sentencing Green Paper
  • Discuss the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill


2. EQUALITY: WHERE NEXT?

Ulele Burnham, Doughty Street Chambers
John Wadham, Equality and Human Rights Commission

More than a year after it was enacted, provisions of the Equality Act 2010 continue to be brought into force. At the same time, the government’s review of employment law threatens to roll back some key protections, including awards of compensation for discrimination. Sweeping cuts to public services also threaten the main statutory watchdog, the Equality and Human Rights Commission, with the government proposing to restrict its remit and functions.

Explore key cases, legislation and proposals in this turbulent area of the law.


3. IMMIGRATION AND ASYLUM

Judith Farbey QC, Doughty Street Chambers
Naina Patel, Blackstone Chambers

The government has continued its programme of seeking to restrict immigration and asylum, including introducing a cap on business migrants, further restrictions on appeal rights, and cuts to legal aid.

At the same time, judgments of the European Court of Justice in Zambrano and McCarthy and the European Court of Human Rights in MSS v Belgium and Greece show the continuing importance of the European courts. And UK Supreme Court judgments in cases such as WL (Congo) and Kambadzi highlight serious shortcomings of the UK Border Agency’s decision-making on a range of issues.

Examine the latest legal developments in this ever-changing field.

12.45

LUNCH

13.45

AFTERNOON BREAKOUT SESSIONS

[please choose one session from following three]


4. JUDICIAL REVIEW AND HUMAN RIGHTS UPDATE

Monica Carss-Frisk QC, Blackstone Chambers
Shaheen Rahman, 1 Crown Office Row

From the retention of DNA in GC v Metropolitan Police to the ability of the Administrative Court to review decisions of the Upper Tribunal in Cart and Eba, judicial review continues to be one of the main battlegrounds over the legal protection of human rights in the UK.

Study the main cases and measures in the field of public law, judicial review and human rights, including coverage of key decisions of the Administrative Court, Court of Appeal, UK Supreme Court, European Court of Justice and European Court of Human Rights.


5. THE BRIBERY ACT

Peter Binning, Corker Binning
Alexander Cameron QC, 3 Raymond Buildings

Corruption is endemic to many countries with poor human rights records. Yet the ability of UK courts to combat it has been hamstrung by the House of Lords’ judgment in the BAE corruption inquiry in 2008.

Will the Bribery Act 2010 have a significant impact on UK companies doing business abroad? What of important questions of legal certainty here in the UK?

Explore the key issues arising under the Act, and their impact on businesses in the UK and abroad.


6. PRIVACY, DEFAMATION AND SUPER-INJUNCTIONS

Heather Rogers QC, Doughty Street Chambers
Sara Mansoori, Matrix Chambers
CHAIR: Adam Wagner, One Crown Office Row

From the ruling of the European Court of Human Rights in Mosley v UK to Lord Neuberger’s report in May 2011 on super-injunctions; from the draft Defamation Bill to the recently established parliamentary committee to established to consider the case for privacy legislation, the three-way battle between the media, Parliament and the courts shows no signs of flagging.

Consider the state of the current law, and proposed changes, in light of the broader relationship between the right to respect for one’s private life under Article 8 ECHR and the right to freedom of expression under Article 10 ECHR.

15.15

TEA BREAK

15.30

AFTERNOON PLENARY SESSIONS

KEYNOTE SPEECH

Lord Judge. Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales

16.00

PANEL DISCUSSION

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Professor of Government, Oxford University
Alison Macdonald, Matrix Chambers
John Wadham, Equality and Human Rights Commission
CHAIR: Roger Smith, JUSTICE

17.00

CLOSE


Please note that programme is subject to change without notice

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